My heart is torn between East and West. I live somewhere between the present and the past. I don't know who I am.


Just another human being biding their time on this earth. Passionate about current affairs, history, politics (particularly MENA region), religion, cute animals and food.

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Posts tagged "Libya"

The making of Benetton’s UNHATE - Dove of Peace. Sixth and final Stage: The final set up of the dove

N.B. I missed out on a few stages, click here to see all of them.

The making of Benetton’s UNHATE - Dove of Peace. Fifth Stage: Transportation of the dove from the University to the King’s Palace square.

N.B. I missed out on a few stages, click here to see all of them.

The making of Benetton’s UNHATE - Dove of Peace. Fourth Stage: Completion and finishing of the dove

N.B. I missed out on a few stages, click here to see all of them.

The making of Benetton’s UNHATE - Dove of Peace. Third Stage: Covering the dove with the shell casings.

N.B. I missed out on a few stages, click here to see all of them.

The making of Benetton’s UNHATE - Dove of Peace. Second stage: Making the clay model of the dove.

Click here to see the first stage.

The making of Benetton’s UNHATE - Dove of Peace. First stage: Collecting the Shell Casings.

"They [the shells] were collected by COLORS from people who live in areas where armed conflicts seem to run on endlessly and who desperately ask for an end to hostilities: from the hands of children, from operating theatres in war-zone hospitals, from the mothers of young men killed during revolutions, from the victims of persecution.

Someone who finds a cartridge case finds a sign of death. Not her or his death, miraculously. But death is in the air, it can come at any time, from anywhere. From the right or wrong side? The answer is worthless, because life is the only value worth defending.”

colorswithlove:

FROM COLORS, WITH LOVE

The magazine “that talks about the rest of the world” donates UNHATE DOVE to Tripoli, Libya. UNHATE DOVE is one of the first monuments to peace after the Arab Spring, which began in Tunisia in December 2010.

Tripoli, Libya, 24 December 2011. COLORS magazine gives UNHATE DOVE to the city of Tripoli as a sign of peace and hope. The large, dove-shaped sculpture is covered in over 22,000 spent cartridges picked up in the world’s “hot spots”.

Conceived by Fabrica, the art installation will be officially donated to Tripoli on Saturday 24 December 2011, Independence Day, which the Libyan people are celebrating again for the first time in 42 years.

The event is part of the Benetton Group’s UNHATE Foundation’s programme  www.unhatefoundation.org 

“The official handing-over of the dove is the UNHATE Foundation’s first act, both concrete and symbolic,” said Alessandro Benetton, Benetton Group’s executive deputy chairman. “Our aim in creating the Foundation is to oppose the culture of hate. It seeks to be a leader and driving force behind the desire for participation and change felt by citizens of the world, especially young people”. 

The cartridge cases were mounted on the dove in the University of Tripoli. They were collected by COLORS from people who live in areas where armed conflicts seem to run on endlessly and who desperately ask for an end to hostilities: from the hands of children, from operating theatres in war-zone hospitals, from the mothers of young men killed during revolutions, from the victims of persecution.

Someone who finds a cartridge case finds a sign of death. Not her or his death, miraculously. But death is in the air, it can come at any time, from anywhere. From the right or wrong side? The answer is worthless, because life is the only value worth defending.

This “war waste” is also the theme of WITH LOVE, a COLORS special issue telling the stories of imprisoned lives that do not have the freedom to choose on which side to stay. There are love stories, too, of those who hold out in order to defend life. Like the 50 journalists working for Shabelle Media Network, an independent radio station of Mogadishu, Somalia, which broadcasts to a catchment area of some 250 km and online. Far from their loved ones, these brave journalists live barricaded in their studio because they fear the vengeance of Al Shabab. They put their safety at risk in order to provide non-partisan information.

Mayada, 55, decided to tell her story because the world should know what is happening in Syria where armed militias have for months repressed popular demonstrations with bloodshed, causing thousands of victims. After fleeing to Lebanon with her husband and their 18-year-old daughter, Mayada is anxiously awaiting the day when she can return to her homeland, which for her has the greatest value of all.

The Egyptian blogger Mina Ibrahim Daniel, Copt, fought for freedom and social justice too and believed in respecting religious beliefs. He was killed together with 24 others on 9 October 2011 during the Maspero demonstrations.

Gaetano, a businessman from Calabria, Italy, has been totally deprived of his freedom. His statements to the police led to the arrest of 48 ‘Ndrangheta mobsters, but for the past decade he and his family have lived under police protection. His greatest fear is not of being killed but of not succeeding in bringing about a radical change. Today his freedom is embodied in his courageous decision to stay in his home region and to not change his identity, in honour of his human dignity.

WITH LOVE is available in four bilingual editions: English + Italian, French, Spanish or Arabic.

The work of art UNHATE DOVE has been conceived by Erik Ravelo, creative director of the special issue COLORS WITH LOVE. The project UNHATE DOVE in Libya has been conceived by Enrico Bossan, editorial director of COLORS magazine.

 

Benetton’s Dove of Peace: a feature article by CreativeReview

pantslessprogressive:

TIME’s Person of the Year: The Protester

It began in Tunisia, where the dictator’s power grabbing and high living crossed a line of shamelessness, and a commonplace bit of government callousness against an ordinary citizen — a 26-year-old street vendor named Mohamed Bouazizi — became the final straw. Bouazizi lived in the charmless Tunisian town of Sidi Bouzid, 125 miles south of Tunis. On a Friday morning almost exactly a year ago, he set out for work, selling produce from a cart. Police had hassled Bouazizi routinely for years, his family says, fining him, making him jump through bureaucratic hoops. On Dec. 17, 2010, a cop started giving him grief yet again. She confiscated his scale and allegedly slapped him. He walked straight to the provincial-capital building to complain and got no response. At the gate, he drenched himself in paint thinner and lit a match.

“My son set himself on fire for dignity,” Mannoubia Bouazizi told me when I visited her.

“In Tunisia,” added her 16-year-old daughter Basma, “dignity is more important than bread.”

In Egypt the incitements were a preposterously fraudulent 2010 national election and, as in Tunisia, a not uncommon act of unforgivable brutality by security agents. In the U.S., three acute and overlapping money crises — tanked economy, systemic financial recklessness, gigantic public debt — along with ongoing revelations of double dealing by banks, new state laws making certain public-employee-union demands illegal and the refusal of Congress to consider even slightly higher taxes on the very highest incomes mobilized Occupy Wall Street and its millions of supporters. In Russia it was the realization that another six (or 12) years of Vladimir Putin might not lead to greater prosperity and democratic normality.

In Sidi Bouzid and Tunis, in Alexandria and Cairo; in Arab cities and towns across the 6,000 miles from the Persian Gulf to the Atlantic Ocean; in Madrid and Athens and London and Tel Aviv; in Mexico and India and Chile, where citizens mobilized against crime and corruption; in New York and Moscow and dozens of other U.S. and Russian cities, the loathing and anger at governments and their cronies became uncontainable and fed on itself. [read more]

Photo: Mannoubia Bouazizi, the mother of Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi. Credit: Peter Hapak/TIME

(via lumosnox44-deactivated20121213)

This image was on the Al Jazeera English website homepage. It didn’t come with a description or any credits but I am guessing that it’s from an anti-government demonstration in San’aa, Yemen. The women have the flags of Syria, Yemen and Libya painted on their hands perhaps to show support and solidarity?

Any help in tracking info. about this image would be very much appreciated, thank you in advance!

no comment.

Bani Walid, Libya: A Libyan National Transitional Council fighter gestures as the sun sets

By: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images

Fighter from ‘Libya, Another Look’ 

"At 15 he fought alongside Omar Mukhtar. Today he fights for freedom once again."

By: David Degner

omg. This is the “omg, I am in Gaddafi’s room” guy <3 I want to meet him…

10 plays
Salah Ghaly

There are just no words to describe this moment! Congratulations to Libya and all the Libyan people!               

                     

This GIF is also very appropriate right now…

Martyr, we salute you. Heroes, you, your souls, taken, your lives, taken but you, you remain. You have given what no other could give, you gave freedom, you gave dignity, you gave honour, you gave light, you gave hope. You ceased to live inside that shell of a body so others could carry on inhibiting theirs but you will never cease to live in our thoughts, in our minds, in our hearts. Every breath we inhale, every word we utter, every step we take, every heart that beats, you, you remain. Martyr, we salute you.

I light a tiny candle in this dim world for all those who have lost the light from their souls, whoever you are, wherever you are, we will never forget you, rest in peace.