My heart is torn between East and West. I live somewhere between the present and the past. I don't know who I am.


Just another human being biding their time on this earth. Passionate about current affairs, history, politics (particularly MENA region), religion, cute animals and food.

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Posts tagged "NOSCAF"

Samira Ibrahim, an Egyptian woman who brought the case against an army doctor accused of conducting forced ‘virginity tests’ on female protesters last year, breaks into tears outside a military court in Cairo.

Photo By: GIANLUIGI GUERCIA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

CAIRO — An Egyptian military tribunal on Sunday acquitted an army doctor of a charge of public obscenity filed by a protester who claimed she was forced to undergo a virginity test while in detention.

The court denied the humiliating tests even took place, despite a ruling by another court and admissions by generals quoted by a leading rights group.

The ruling further infuriated the country’s revolutionary youth movements, who have said claims of the virginity tests were the first sign that the generals who took over from deposed President Hosni Mubarak 13 months ago were carrying on his repressive practices.

Less than four months before the military is scheduled to hand over power to a civilian administration, Sunday’s verdict was likely to lend credibility to widespread suspicions that the generals were trying to remove any legal basis for prosecution for crimes committed during their rule after they step down. Activists are calling for the generals to face charges for human rights abuses.

Samira Ibrahim, one of seven women who said they were forced to undergo examinations to determine if they were virgins while detained by the military a year ago, won a civilian court ruling last year that affirmed the tests were taking place at military jails and ordered they be halted.

Military prosecutors investigating her accusations brought only one individual, Dr. Ahmed Adel, to trial, and he was acquitted. The verdict cannot be appealed. The court denied that such tests were carried out.

“No one stained my honor,” Ibrahim wrote on her Twitter account after the verdict. “The one that had her honor stained is Egypt. I will carry on until I restore Egypt’s rights.”

Maj. Gen. Adel al-Mursi, head of the military prosecution, defended the verdict in a statement carried by Egypt’s official news agency. He said the judge ruled “according to his conscience and in view of the case’s documents.” He said witnesses for the plaintiff gave conflicting testimony, and that Adel was acquitted also because the testimonies of two prison guards, the jail’s security officer and the head of its clinic insisted that no such test was carried out.

“The court’s denial of the tests being conducted went against written testimonies of several public figures who discussed the issue with several of the ruling generals,” rights lawyer Adel Ramadan said.

The virginity tests created the first tension between the generals and women, tens of thousands of whom took part in the uprising against Mubarak. Late last year, army troops were caught on camera beating female protesters with sticks and stomping on them while they lay helpless on the ground.

One woman was stripped half naked by the troops as they beat her. The video that captured the incident caused an uproar in this conservative, mainly Muslim nation of 85 million people.

Amnesty International said in June that Egypt’s generals acknowledged carrying out the tests on female protesters. It said Maj. Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, a member of the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, justified the tests as a way to protect the army from rape allegations. The rights group said al-Sisi vowed the military would not conduct such tests again.

The virginity test allegations first surfaced after a March 9 rally in Cairo’s downtown Tahrir Square, epicenter of last year’s uprising, that turned violent when men in plain clothes attacked protesters, and the army intervened to clear the square by force. Ibrahim was detained along with scores of men and women, and a military tribunal later sentenced her to a suspended 12-month prison term.

The military has been in power since Mubarak stepped down last year in the face of a popular uprising. The Mubarak-era generals who succeeded their former patron face accusations by rights activists of killing protesters, torturing detainees and trying at least 10,000 civilians in military tribunals.

They are also accused of bungling the transition and seeking to preserve their decades-old immunity from civilian oversight.

Copied : A sad day for Egypt, and for human and, especially, women’s rights and dignity across the world. Samira Ibrahim (shown crying in the picture), one of a group of female protesters who was forced to undergo a mandatory ‘virginity test’ (i.e. grave sexual abuse) by the military police a year ago, lost her case today against a military physician accused of carrying out the test. The tremendous sacrifices she made by speaking out for justice against the murderous military junta should not, will not be in vain. Egyptians, the world, should not allow SCAF a ‘safe exit’ if there’s to be any hope left for this revolution. 16 March, Egyptian Women’s Day, go out and march!

lumosnox44:

(via http://www.facebook.com/ElShaheeed)

A sign from the anti-SCAf rally held today in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt

Translation:

"A message to my dear sister: [in reference to this]

I am sorry…I am sorry about everything. They [the army] are the ones who were exposed, not you. You have unveiled all of our faults…all of us.”

(via lumosnox44-deactivated20121213)

A doctor in tears after he failed to save one of the injured. [near Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt]

Via Twitter: 

Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt - November 20th, 2011:

8 unmoving bodies in Tahrir. Pic. I took 3 hours ago, just got to a computer to upload it. Not sure how many dead vs. unconscious. Corner of #tahrir sq. & tahrir st.”

Via: @anjucomet

1.350 hits in about ELEVEN minutes! SCAF, you are the NEXT! Every Egyptian killed by cops, is a nail in the SCAF’s coffin”

By: @CarlosLatuff

Bahaa El-Deen Senousi, one of the founders of the Revolutionary TM Party, shot dead today in Egypt following clashes between police and protesters in Cairo’s Tahrir square which have left at least 2 people dead and hundreds more injured. 

7asbunallah wa ni3m al wakeel fil maglis il 3askary, ro7o rabina yinti2m minkum!

Huge banner at Oakland Port: End US Military Aid to Egypt, Free @alaa ! #occupyoakland http://pic.twitter.com/33hzAH3K ”

Abd El Fattah, one of Egypt’s most prominent anti-regime voices and a former political prisoner under the Mubarak dictatorship, was taken into military custody on Sunday evening following public criticisms of the army’s conduct on the night of 9 October, when at least 27 people were killed during a Coptic Christian protest in downtown Cairo.

Read more: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/nov/02/egyptian-activist-alaa-accuses-army?newsfeed=true

It is dangerous to be right when the government is wrong.–Voltaire

By: @DarthNader

[Photo and Article by D. Parvaz/Al Jazeera]

CAIRO, Egypt - There’s virtually nothing on the streets of the country’s capital that might give you an indication that Egypt is just weeks away from its parliamentary election - the first one since former president Hosni Mubarak’s ousting.

People aren’t talking about the candidates, as the final list has not yet been determined. There’s nothing in the way of campaign banners or material in public spaces.

If anything, the signs, banners and posters that remain are all related to the revolution, and despite the fact that the atmosphere at the famous Tahrir Square resembles a county fair - with food, jewellery, toy and T-shirt vendors galore - the sentiment right now is one of anger and frustration.

The October 9 Maspero incident (when a peaceful protest march turned violent, leaving 27 dead and many more injured) has served as a rallying cry to continue pushing back against the country’s ruling military. 

There is also an organised movement against the use of military tribunals to try civilians.

A series of statements made by the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) this week - that workers who protest and strike are “wrong” to do so, that people should stop accusing the armed forces of “betrayal,” and that Maspero deaths were not caused by military fire - did not serve to assuage those concerns.

"They did this to dishearten us," said Mostafa Mohie, 27, a member of the Socialist People’s Alliance.

"They want to make it seem that nothing has changed." 

But he points to the growing labour movement - and the protests therein - to show that things have changed.

Repeating the narrative of the armed protester - one which has been hotly disputed by those who were at the October 9 march - also serves to reinforce the idea that SCAF needs to remain in power to protect the people, all the way through the presidential elections, which for now, have been pushed back to March 2013.

On a Wednesday appearance on Dream and Tahrir channels, by two SCAF army generals Mahmoud Hegazy and Mohamed El-Assar, El-Assar seemed to hint that demonstrations would not be tolerated during the elections.

"No police forces in the world are able to secure elections and demonstrations at the same time," he said. 

"We just hope the people don’t hold any demonstrations during the elections.”

That seems unlikely, given that there have already been a few marches and protests around town in response to the Maspero killings. (Note: An interview with a SCAF critic Alaa El-Aswany on the Akher Kalam show was cancelled on Thursday, and the show’s host Yosri Fouda announced via Facebook that he had halted his show indefinitely in response to “relentless” censorship). 

When asked if he held out any hope that the parliamentary elections would progress the goals of the revolution, Mohie said he felt the opposite - that the parliamentary elections would only slow things down. 

He said that those who were likely to get voted in - many of whom had ties to the Mubarak’s regime - would only stymie change. 

This is a strange irony to consider, that the democracy Egyptians fought for can hit a brick wall at its very first elections.

"When you take the revolution to the elections, you will lose. We will lose in these elections," Mohie said.

  Follow D. Parvaz on Twitter: @Dparvaz

Cairo, Egypt: Coptic Christians carry coffins as they make their way to Abbasaiya cathedral during a mass funeral for victims of sectarian clashes with murder committed by soldiers and riot police after a protest about an attack on a church in southern Egypt

By: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters

خلص الكلام 

THIS PICTURE ISN’T FROM PALESTINE, SYRIA, IRAQ, AFGHANISTAN…THIS PICTURE IS FROM EGYPT.

It could’ve been your brother/father/uncle/cousin. This is it. You’re either with the thugs and the army, or Egypt and its people still fighting for justice and freedom. Help spread the word.

Death toll in clashes rises to 23. NOSCAF.

*UPDATE FROM @kristenchick: “I just learned the woman sitting in the morgue holding the dead man’s hand and screaming “No! I won’t leave him!” was his fiancée." </3

Egyptian Army and police viciously beating up a protester!

"On October 4 thousands of Copts staged a peaceful rally to protest the September 30 torching of St. George’s Church in Elmarinab, Edfu, Aswan province…Egyptian security forces fired gunshots in the air to terrorise the protesters, who were beaten with batons. A priest, Father Mattias Nasr, was pushed to the ground and beaten. Mobile phones and cameras were confiscated from anyone trying to take photos of the assault.

Video footage taken from the balcony of a nearby building surfaced later on youtube, it showed the military and police beating 28-year-old Copt Raef Anwar Fahim, who had the misfortune to stumble while fleeing and was left behind by his colleagues who were being chased by the police in the surrounding streets. 

"I was the last one behind, a policeman hit me with a baton on the shoulder and I fell," he said. "They were firing live ammunition. In a manner of seconds over 15 policemen attacked me."

HOW CAN ALL THE HITTING, KICKING, SWEARING, SHOUTING, BEATING… BE JUSTIFIED? HE DID NOTHING! I AM A MUSLIM AND I STAND UP FOR THE RIGHTS OF MY COPTIC BROTHERS AND SISTERS, NOSCAF, NOSCAF, NOSCAF!

Deadly Cairo clashes over Coptic protest - At least 19 people reported killed as riots erupt during Coptic Christian demonstration against destruction of a church.
Vivian &amp; Michael: The top picture shows them at their engagement, the bottom: she holds his dead body&#8217;s hand. 
When will the army stop destroying Egypt and the efforts of the revolution? WAKE UP WORLD: The struggle of the Egyptian people did not stop when Mubarak stepped down; unnecessary force being used against civilians, civilians being tried in military courts, families of martyrs still haven&#8217;t received compensation, state TV still spewing a crap load of propaganda, people still being tried for voicing their opinions, army trying to create non-existent friction between Muslims and Copts to justify emergency law which by the way, has been re-introduced by the army&#8230; the list goes on, when will all this injustice end? I think it&#8217;s time we got ourselves down to Tahrir again, NOSCAF, NOSCAF, NOSCAF!

Deadly Cairo clashes over Coptic protest - At least 19 people reported killed as riots erupt during Coptic Christian demonstration against destruction of a church.

Vivian & Michael: The top picture shows them at their engagement, the bottom: she holds his dead body’s hand. 

When will the army stop destroying Egypt and the efforts of the revolution? WAKE UP WORLD: The struggle of the Egyptian people did not stop when Mubarak stepped down; unnecessary force being used against civilians, civilians being tried in military courts, families of martyrs still haven’t received compensation, state TV still spewing a crap load of propaganda, people still being tried for voicing their opinions, army trying to create non-existent friction between Muslims and Copts to justify emergency law which by the way, has been re-introduced by the army… the list goes on, when will all this injustice end? I think it’s time we got ourselves down to Tahrir again, NOSCAF, NOSCAF, NOSCAF!